Our Readers Write . . .

Mr. McDonald:
This doctor is still licensed in Michigan (Texas revoked his license due to charges). The State of Michigan says, “Respondent was remorseful regarding his conduct and was fully cooperative in resolving this matter. In addition, Respondents convictions were not practice related and did not involve respondent initiating or making contact with children.”
In the meantime, he looks like a saint on the internet:

I saw your article in the Detroit Free Press today. I have been trying to get legislation passed in Michigan for years. Michigan has about 30 sex offenders practicing (doctors who assaulted their own patients). Is this typical in other states?
Thank you.
Carlo Vendittelli
Canton, Michigan
 __________________
Our response:
Carlo –
The short answer is “yes” physician sexual predators are relicensed in all 50 states, although to be fair, some states are responding to the abject embarrassment of that reality, by taking baby steps to change the ugly status quo.
In the end, it is extremely important for the public to know that – unlike what they believe to be true – physicians as a profession are routinely held to the LOWEST ethical standards in society. As a poster-child example, one need look no further than the medical monster named Visu Vilvarajah, MD, who was reissued a medical license after murdering his wife and her mother:
 _________________
To our way of thinking, the inherent mind-fog in American healthcare is their damnable predilection of dismissing the appalling misbehaviors of their colleagues as “rare events.”
 _________________
They are not “rare” at all. They happen hundreds of times per day by hundreds of practitioners; their crimes are stunning and unrelenting; and the typical decent physicians doing ethical work every day, remain stupifyingly silent about the criminals in their midst.
 _________________
Sometimes SILENCE is itself a crime, is it not?
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2 thoughts on “Our Readers Write . . .

  1. Well said! Silence isn’t always golden!

  2. Doctor Watchdog says:

    Even the Texas board order is pretty namby-pamby: “The felony involved possession of pornography.”

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